A FAMILY PAPER DEVOTED TO THE NEWS OF THE DAY IN SOUTH DANVERS (PEABODY), MASSACHUSETTS
January 6 June 29, 1864 - Part VI
About The Wizard

About South Danvers, Mass.

Fig. 1.1. "View of South Danvers", 

South Danvers: Jan. - July 1864

  Library of Congress: 
Photo Timeline of the War 1864

Civil War @ Smithsonian
 

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South Davers Wizard
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About the Wizard Index      Images       Bibliography
 About S. M. Smoller      Contact S. M. Smoller
Assorted Advertisements Appearing in the Wizard 1864

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Fig. 1   1859 "view of South Danvers as seen from that delightful spot, the Essex Rail Road Station.  To strangers arriving in town, the prospect from that position, is refreshing, as well as imposing, and leaves a favorable first impression on the mind. It will be seen that our artist, with a keen and appreciative eye to the picturesque, has introduced into the foreground of the picture, several objects proper to the location, among which are the fish, suggestive of the alewife fishery, and the aquatic fowl, common to the place.
    "South Danvers is very ancient, probably as old as the creation.  It is part of the Solar system, and in ancient times, it was thought that the Sun revolved around it.  It has since been ascertained, that it revolves around the sun.  It has attached to it a planet called Earth, of which it forms a part.  In size, the town is about six miles long, four broad, and about 4000 miles deep, terminating in a point, at the center of the earth.  On the map, it resembles, in shape a salt fish, with its tail cut off.  Among its principal productions, are onions and upper leather.  It was formerly famous for its witches.  It is now chiefly remarkable for its settlement, called Devils Dishfull, the gravestone of Eliza Wharton, and the printing office of a newspaper called The Wizard."

February 20, 2002